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The Goldilocks Effect: Payroll Funding That Is Just Right

You’ve probably heard the well-worn story of Goldilocks and the Three Bears. In this age-old tale, young Goldilocks is out for a walk in the woods when she stumbles upon the cabin belonging to the three bears. Upon entering and realizing nobody was home, she tests out each of the bears’ beds. Finding baby bear’s bed to be “just right,” Goldilocks promptly falls into a deep, fitful sleep. In real-life, this concept of finding solutions that are “just right” is important, especially in business.

Often times, staffing companies struggle to find the ideal solution to their cash flow woes. Let’s take a closer look at what these challenges are and how they can be overcome.

Funding Your Payroll

When it comes to paying your employees, there are a number of different options available to you. Determining which one is “just right” will depend on your specific business needs and a wide variety of other factors. These options include:

Traditional Revenue Funding – That is, relying on your incoming revenue to issue payroll. While on paper this may seem like the wisest choice, in reality, it may actually be more challenging than you may realize. After all, if your payroll is contingent solely on your income, what happens during a financial down turn? Furthermore, if most of your profits are being paid back out, this type of setup can stunt your ability to grow.

Payroll Loans – Another viable option for funding your payroll is taking out a bank loan. This isn’t necessarily a terrible idea, but it’s not the right fit for everyone. It’s important to weigh the pros and cons of taking on additional debt and to assess your company’s financial ability to repay the loan without stretching yourself too thin. Additionally, if you’re finding yourself in a position to need extra funding for your payroll needs on a regular basis, bank loans could potentially make matters worse. In fact, you may not even be approved.

Payroll Funding – The third option is invoice factoring or payroll funding. Unlike the other two methods, there is no dipping into existing or incoming funds, nor does it involve incurring any type of debt (and the interest payments that come along with it). Instead, you simply sell some or all of your outstanding accounts receivable to a factoring company for a small fee. The cash payment you receive in return can then be used to fund payroll (or any other business needs you may have).

When you consider the three available options, it becomes clear that for the majority of staffing companies, payroll funding is the solution that fits “just right.” This is especially true for smaller to mid-sized firms or those that wish to grow and expand, as it doesn’t require the use of existing profits nor does it depend on bank approval or credit-worthiness.

Some of the other benefits of staffing factoring or payroll funding include:

Fast Access to Working Capital – With the right partner, you can have the funds you need in no time. Eliminate the time-consuming task of waiting for invoices to be paid or for banks to make decisions. Get your cash when you need it.

Flexibility – If there’s one thing about the staffing industry, it’s that there can be tremendous ebbs and flows in the demand for talent. With payroll financing, you don’t have to worry about how you’ll keep up with these changing demands, because you’ll always have access to the funding you need.

Opportunity – Growth is something that many smaller staffing businesses strive to achieve. The problem is, many find it difficult to compete due to financial restraints. Having access to funding when you need it allows you to take on those larger clients without the worry of how differing payment cycles might impact your business.

Customer/Client Satisfaction – When you no longer struggle to meet payroll, regardless of external or internal circumstances, employees and the companies you place them with will find your staffing company “just right” too!

Want to learn more about payroll funding? Click here or contact us today!

Payroll Funding

Recruiting Strategies to Catch the Millennials

Staying up-to-date on the latest recruiting strategies can be tough, particularly when it comes to attracting quality candidates from the millennial generation. The reason it’s so challenging is because individuals from this demographic are markedly different from previous generations. Before you find yourself frustrated and ready to throw in the towel, let’s take a look at some creative recruiting resources staffing agencies can employ to help win over Millennials.

Understand what motivates them.

Unlike Baby Boomers and Gen Xers, Millennials have a completely unique set of desires and needs when it comes to their careers. For instance, younger workers place a much stronger emphasis on things like flexibility, work/life balance and growth opportunity than traditional motivating factors, like salary. Understanding what these workers are looking for can help you position your openings to make them more attractive.

Use social media.

The Millennial generation uses social media for much more than just keeping up with friends and family. They also turn to these online networking sites to connect with brands, make purchasing decisions and – yes – even look for work. If you want to reach candidates from this younger group, you have to meet them where they are, so be sure to incorporate social media into your recruiting strategies.

Create a mobile friendly site.

These days it seems just about everyone has a smartphone or other type of handheld device. This is especially true for Millennials, who are referred to as the first digital natives since they were born and raised during a time when the internet and things like cloud technology were the norm. In terms of staffing, some 1 billion job searches are conducted using a mobile device each and every month. Leverage this by ensuring that your recruiting site is mobile-friendly and can be easily accessed and navigated using any device.

Make culture a top priority.

Candidates from the younger generation want to work for companies that have invested in developing and fostering cultures that value people, not just the bottom line. That’s why employer branding is so important during the recruiting process. Staffing professionals must find a way to demonstrate and effectively “sell” the overall vibe and culture of the company if they want to win over Millennials.

Provide work that matters.

Another key differentiator of the millennial generation is how strongly they feel about making a difference. This applies both to the impact they can potentially make with their employer as well as in the world around them. For this reason, recruiting strategies must involve clearly defining and effectively communicating the role being offered and how it factors in with the big picture.

Be competitive.

Last but not least, if you want to attract and win over the hearts and minds of millennial workers, you must remain at peak performance and in sound financial shape. If payroll funding and cash flow issues are holding you back from successfully reaching qualified candidates, funding through staffing factoring might be just the solution. This will allow you to focus on getting the right people instead of worrying about how to keep them.

With Millennials now occupying more than 50% of today’s workforce, figuring out the best way to reach, engage and appeal to them is more important than ever. By incorporating the above best practices into your overall recruiting strategy, you’ll have a much better chance of landing the types of quality younger candidates that will help drive the ongoing success of your business.

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Hands with money, taxes

Tax Tips for Staffing Agencies

With the new year comes concerns about staffing news and about correctly filing staffing taxes for your temporary staffing agency. Tax surprises are rarely good. Whether you have filed before or your agency is new within the last year, getting through tax season with accurate and acceptable payroll and tax records are imperative to the success of your business.

Know Your Company’s Tax Status

Although it depends somewhat on your location, most states consider staffing or temporary agencies to be the full employers of temporary employees. This designation requires that your business has a state tax identification number as well as an EIN from the federal tax administration. Double-check with your tax attorney or accountant for the classification of your company before you begin the tax process.

If your agency is, in fact, the employer of temporary employees, you may also find yourself subjected to paying employment taxes. These include temp agency payroll taxes, Medicare, Social Security and federal unemployment taxes and federal income tax withholding.

Completing all of these forms and filings can make your staffing taxes much more complicated than you had originally envisioned. For that reason, consider these tips to help you complete your tax process:

1. Understand Your Payroll Taxes

Your staffing agency is subject to taxation at both the federal and state level, and you are responsible for collecting unemployment taxes from your employees. Although it may be tempting to label your employees as “independent contractors,” the facts that you have legally provided these individuals with their set hours of employment, that you have a continuing working relationship with them and that you are paying them with a set payment method all indicate that they are business employees.

When companies pay your agency to employ your temporary workers, you are responsible for collecting payroll taxes from the pay that is passed on to those workers. The amounts of money that change hands should be clearly spelled out in the contract you make with the hiring companies, as well as with your employees.

2. Calculate the Withholding Amount from Employees’ W-4 Forms

Federal law mandates that you determine the amount withheld from each employee via the information provided by the employee on his or her IRS Form W-4.

With each wage payment that you make to the employee, you are required to withhold an amount. This number is likely different for each employee, depending on his or her earned wages and claimed exemptions. Each wage payment is considered a separate taxable event and must be treated as such.

Use the standard tables provided by the IRS to determine the amount withheld for each of your employees. This amount is based on:

  • The size of each wage payment
  • The frequency of payroll payments
  • The employee’s current marital status
  • The employee’s claimed withholding exemptions as filed on the W-4 form

The W-4 forms are only for you and your company to determine proper exemptions and withholdings as you are calculating your payroll taxes. You do not need to file them with the government or the IRS unless there is a discrepancy in information.

The total amount that you withhold should approximate each employee’s year-end tax liability. If you do not have a completed W-4 for an employee, treat that person’s withholdings as being single with no exemptions.

3. Provide a W-2 to Each Employee

As a company, you are required to withhold the proper amounts from your employees’ pay and to deposit those amounts with the appropriate tax agencies. These withholdings will include federal and state taxes, Medicare and Social Security taxes and federal and state unemployment taxes. In order to complete these requirements, you must provide all of your employees with proper W-2 and 1099 reports that thoroughly explain their yearly compensation and withholding amounts.

All employees must receive a W-2 by January 31 of the year following the employment year. Those who do maintain an independent contractor status and earned more than 600 dollars in compensation should receive a 1099 instead.

4. File and Pay Federal and State Taxes on Time

You can avoid tax penalties by paying your federal and state taxes on time. Your federal tax deposit must be made electronically through one of these methods:

  • The Treasury Department’s free Electronic Federal Tax Payment System (EFTPS)
  • A trusted third party, such as a payroll service or tax professional
  • A financial institution that can initiate an ACH Credit payment

Many states now also require your deposits to be made electronically. Consult your state agencies for more information.

All deposits must be made on time. If your due date falls on a Saturday, Sunday or national legal holiday, you have until the close of the next business day to complete your deposit.

5. Maintain Proper Records

Once you have successfully distributed all your W-2 and 1099 forms to your employees and independent contractors, you must make sure that you have proper records that explain the payroll taxes that you paid for the year. Per the federal requirements, keep all records for at least four years before destroying them. Check your state record-keeping requirements as well.

Should the IRS ever question your payroll or business, these records must be kept for examination. Make sure that you have:

  • The names, addresses and Social Security numbers for every employee
  • The period of employment and compensation for each employee
  • The total amounts of pay given to each employee
  • The amounts of each payment kept as taxable wages
  • Complete copies of each employee’s W-4 form
  • All dates and records for each tax deposit made by your company
  • Thorough copies of all tax returns filed
  • Any and all W-2 forms that were undeliverable to past employees

All of these records must be kept in an orderly fashion to be immediately examined by an IRS official if requested.

For more information about taxes and for staffing news, follow Triumph Business Capital on Facebook, Google+ or Twitter.