Factoring Companies

Who Knows You? By Timothy D. Brady

Recently I saw an idiom that said “Hustle until you no longer need to introduce yourself.” This got me to thinking on a couple of related thoughts.

Why would you stop hustling when everyone knows who you are?

Under what circumstances would it be no longer necessary to introduce yourself to others?

First let’s define the word ‘hustle’ in this particular context.

Most dictionaries have the following definitions:
1. to quickly move or push (someone), often in a rough way.
2. to move or work in a quick and energetic way.
3. to play a sport with a lot of energy and effort.

For the purposes of this article, I’ll use number 2. to move or work in a quick and energetic way.

Now to provide my thoughts on the two previous questions.

Why would you stop hustling when everyone knows who you are?

In my opinion, even if you walk into a room full of people where everyone knows you, (the ‘Cheers’ syndrome), wouldn’t it be a little presumptuous and a bit egoistical to assume there isn’t at least one person who doesn’t know who you are and what you do? I think your focus when doing business with others, no matter whether you’re Bill Gates, Warren Buffet or the new guy on the block, a bit of humbleness goes a long way with customers and people who have the potential of someone with whom you’d like to do business. The idea for success in marketing, maintaining current and creating future customers, is through the respect you show each and every person you come in contact with, regardless whether they know who you are or not.

Under what circumstances would it be no longer necessary to introduce yourself to others?
I recall a scene in the movie The Devil Wears Prada where the character Amanda Priestly is flanked by her two assistants who’ve spent hours studying photos of all the guests and personal details of their lives before Ms. Priestly’s huge event. That way she had names, nicknames, marital status and so on at her disposal while greeting all. The purpose of this, while she no longer needed to be introduced, as everyone knew her, was for her to show respect to every guest who was important or potentially important to her or her business’s future. Just remember it’s not who knows you, it’s who you know (and do they respect you) that determines your success.

A couple of other thoughts concerning how much someone should hustle even after they’re well known within their industry. In trucking, the industry is always evolving; i.e., regulations, HOS, technology and logistics in general, so you never know when the person with whom you do business today may not be in a decision-making position tomorrow – and someone new,  who doesn’t know you, is the person with whom you’ll be working.

So never assume you’re so well-known that you’ll never need to introduce yourself in the future.

Contact Tim Brady at 731-749-8567 or at www.timothybrady.com